Facing the Truth on Immigration and DACA

In recent days, the debate over immigration policies have raced ahead amid charges of racism, amnesty, an impending government funding deadline, and the March 5 expiration of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), even grinding government to a halt. Remarkably, a group of republican Senators, led by Lindsey Graham, wish to capitulate to democrat demands, granting a path to citizenship for 3 million illegal immigrants, give their parents work permits, and in exchange, republicans would merely get $2.7 billion for border security, a pittance, and only modest changes to our legal immigration system.

Such a policy will give millions amnesty without taking actions to ensure we don’t face a flood of illegal immigrants again in 25 years, repeating Ronald Reagan’s 1986 immigration mistake, granting amnesty now for border security that never materializes. If Americans wanted blanket amnesty, we had ample opportunity with the candidacies of Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio, and Hillary Clinton. Donald Trump staked out the only law-enforcement, citizen-minded immigration policies, and he won. To capitulate now is to ignore the message voters sent in 2016. DACA is the only bargaining chip Trump and republicans have; they must use it to reform a legal immigration system that has hurt working American citizens.

Since 1999, real median household income is up less than 1% to about $59,000. Working people have suffered two lost decades even as the rich get richer. A major reason why is the surge in immigration. America is now home to over 45 million immigrants, compared to less than 20 million in 1990. Over 13% of our population is foreign born, the highest level since before World War I. It has been steadily increasing since hitting 5% in 1970.

            Historically, our immigration intake has been cyclical, which is to say we take in a large number of immigrants, and then slow down the intake as we assimilate them into our culture. As that process ends, we let immigration levels rise again, a process that has worked well. That pattern played out in the 1900s with high immigration levels through World War I, which we then slowed through 1970 (a period where coincidentally the modern American middle class was built), and which subsequently have been rising. With immigrant levels at a century high, we have to decide whether to let this uptrend continue or slow immigration as the RAISE Act would do.

Just from an economic perspective, the data argues for slower immigration. During the immigrant boom of the past twenty years, the middle class hasn’t enjoyed any real wage gains. We recognize the laws of supply and demand in almost everything but immigration. When supply goes up, prices go down. Immigration increases the supply of labor, driving the price lower. This is great for business owners who employ laborers (hence why the corporatist GOP establishment favors ever more immigration), but bad for wage-earners. If America had a sustained labor shortage, that would call for more immigration, but if anything, we’ve suffered from an excess of labor.

Over the past 20 years, the unemployment rate has averaged 5.9%. The Federal Reserve estimates the unemployment rate consistent with a full labor market is 4.6%. In other words, for the past two decades, America has had a structurally loose jobs market with 1.8 million Americans unnecessarily unemployed on average. During this time, the flow of immigrants has continued unabated. It’s no wonder wages have barely budged. We are doing a bad job getting the people already here employed; there’s no need to keep bringing in a record number of new people too.

            Even today with the unemployment rate at 4.1% and talk of a tight labor market, fewer Americans under the age of 55 are working than in 2000, even though the population of 25 to 54 year olds has grown over 5 million. While the labor force participation rate among prime working age adults is at or near highs in nations like Germany and Japan, ours is well below last decade’s level. Not to mention after years of loose jobs markets that benefited employers, America’s workers will benefit from a prolonged period of tight employment where businesses are competing for workers, forced to raise wages. In a tight labor market, businesses would have to train American citizens, improving their potential earnings, rather than import skilled labor and let American citizens form an underclass. Considering their lower median earnings and higher unemployment rates, African-American and Hispanic-Americans would disproportionately benefit from a tight labor market policy, making the charges of racism from immigration expansionists all the more laughable.

            After two lost decades for America’s working people, now is the time to slow immigration and let citizen wages rise. If Republicans and Trump truly want to listen to their base and help the forgotten men and women, they can’t capitulate to amnesty for millions of “dreamers,” and must negotiate lower legal immigration levels to make the dreams of America’s citizens more attainable. If they can’t hold this line, what was the point of the 2016 election?

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Time to Unite Behind Trump

While the media focuses exclusively on deepening divides within the Republican Party, we need to take a step back and remember the stakes of this election. A certain Senator this evening exhorted voters to “vote their conscience.” Yes, his non-endorsement of Donald Trump was clear, but let’s consider what our conscience actually demands of us.

Does your conscience consider the fact 3,400 Americans, many of them children, have been killed in the past 8 years in the city of Chicago acceptable? How about the fact the unemployment rate for African-American teenagers has risen in 2016 to 31%? Or that economic growth, the ultimate engine for lifting people out of poverty and into the middle class, is running at the slowest pace in a peace-time recovery since World War II? Are you comfortable with the fact that after years of decline, the violent crime rate has been rising since early 2015? Can your conscience tolerate the fact that Radical Islam is on the march, poisoning the minds of millions, seeping into Europe and even this country, while stripping millions of Muslim women and gays in the Middle East of basic human rights and dignity?

Are we willing to accept that this is the best that America can be? If your conscience says, “yes, the status quo is acceptable,” then perhaps you should vote for Hillary Clinton. After all, she is not an agent of change. Rather, she is beholden to an entrenched donor and political class that will continue the policies of President Barack Obama. Moreover, this status quo will persist beyond her 4 year term as she appoints judges, regulators, commissioners, and civil servants who could serve decades beyond her final day in office. A Hillary Clinton Presidency will cement our current trajectory for a generation. However, even if you are comfortable with the status quo, does your conscience permit you to vote for a woman of Hillary Clinton’s character? Obama’s own FBI Director noted Clinton’s “extreme carelessness” as she attempted to keep her emails secret from voters while exposing our nation’s secrets to our enemies. She even told the mother of an American killed in Benghazi that a video was the cause of the attack while telling her own daughter and a foreign diplomat otherwise. If Hillary Clinton can’t be trusted to tell a grieving mother the truth, can she be trusted in the event of a national crisis?

True to the American spirit of perpetually seeking national betterment, perhaps your conscience says the status quo isn’t good enough, that we can do better. That we can turn a safety net that merely makes poverty more palatable into a safety trampoline which makes poverty less prevalent. That we should give all parents choice where their children go to school to end the vicious circle of entrenched poverty. That we can accelerate growth by returning power and freedom to the most innovate citizenry the world has ever known. That we have a leader who is unafraid to call out evil in the world by its true name and work to eradicate it, instead of merely downplaying it.

Doing better requires doing something else. It requires voting not for an all-talk-no-action entrenched DC elite but for an outsider who is a doer not a talker. Doesn’t our conscience demand a vote for Donald Trump? We need a President who will cease to accept the decline into mediocrity that is our present course. Would we not rather have Paul Ryan as a governing partner with a Republican White House than as a leader of the opposition against yet another Democrat President who is simply presenting the same old ideas in new packaging?

If we believe conservative principles will make American lives better, we have a moral imperative to vote for the candidate most likely to institute them. Without a doubt, that candidate is Donald Trump, helped by his fantastic running mate, Mike Pence, and a partner in Congress in Speaker Ryan. I will vote my conscience, and it demands a vote for Donald Trump.

He offers change. She offer more of the same. He will return power to ordinary people and to the markets to free up the economy, boost working Americans, and improve social mobility. She will continue the same top-heavy policies that have seen weakened growth and ever-rising inequality. He will restore strength around the world after a President who has let American power recede by backing off red lines, downplaying Radical Islamic terror, and letting China expand in the South China Sea. Her foreign policy? Well, let’s put it this way: if global warming is such a major problem, perhaps the fact Secretary of State Hillary Clinton left a world on fire shares some of the blame.

Let’s unite and win in 2016.